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Too much to read…

I get sent books, I buy them and I borrow them. I’m a sucker for a good title. But if they are in “my field” I think they deserve passing along. So here are some comments about ones I found I was glad to have read this past month or two.
1. Letters of Recommendation, by Maxine McClintock is a surprisingly engaging fictional dialogue between a high school teacher and a very sensitive student about the value of what they’ve has been engaged in. I kept turning down page corners (tsk tsk) and over time I shall be quoting from the author.
2. Citizenship Now, edited by Jon and Marjorie Ford consists of short essays by almost everyone I admire (including some I disagree with), and, NOTE, including a piece by me on “Educating a Democracy.” I think it’s meant to be used in courses focused on civic education.
3. Ditto for Defending Childhood edited by Beverly Falk. The chapters are on important issues, such as George Madaus and Terrence Lee-St. John’s on “Standardized Testing: Unheeded Issues That Impact Children’s Learning.” A good collection for our times.
4, Real Teachers, True Stories of Renegade Educators by Stuart Grauer about unorthodox teachers in unusual settings that are bound to intrigue you. Restorative.
5. Leaving to Learn, by Elliot Washor and Charles Mojkowski — whose work I’ve followed for decades. With a foreword by Ken Robinson. It’s a book of advice, but not preachy and chock full of accounts that I’ve not heard from Elliot before. The title alone should intrigue you.

These five are enough for now — a long weekend perhaps! Also good to keep by your bedside and share with others.

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One Response

  1. Sounds about right for now. Piscataway has had the best year. The two Hunterdon teams have beaten all the oehtrs (except for North’s loss to Montgomery.) Then come the two Somerset finalists, with Ville over GSB based on their win head-to-head. Then the two Somerset semi-final losers. Then you round out the rest with schools that have been lurking at or below 8-9-10 all year. Of course, given that these teams will play each other over the week (for starters, 5 plays 7; 4 plays 5; 2 and 3 should meet) this will change substantially once the State tournament starts.

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